How religion is eating us alive

We all know what a virus is.  Some viruses are not too dangerous, but most of the viruses that invade our body make us unwell at the very least.  A lot of viruses actually kill us.

A virus works by invading our body and it feeds on us to make itself bigger, whilst making us react in whatever is the by-product of its invasion.  Usually, the virus isn’t concious of what it is doing to its host other than using it as food to aid its reproduction and development.  It leaps from one host to the next in order to survive, a bit like we might leap from McDonalds to McDonalds.

Some viruses leave us delusional as they can seriously affect and alter our brains processes, some leave us changed and affected for the remainder of our lives, a lot of them change or damage us physically.  Yet, medical science has been good at working out how to fight off large numbers of them, killing them outright, or treating us so that we can ‘naturally’ resit the virus as it invades our system.

Well, resist it until it mutates in order to deal with the changes we’ve made, a bit like we might find we can no longer enter McDonalds, and so opt for and get used to Burger King instead.

Religion is a virus.  It’s a very dangerous potentially fatal virus of the mind.  The only way it’s contracted is by coming into contact with others infected by it.  There’s no other way it can be contracted.  Babies and young children are the most vulnerable, usually contracting the virus from birth from their parents.

Once the religion virus is inside the brain it is extremely hard to fight and remove, such is the damage it does to the normal methods of eradicating it such as rational thinking and logical thought.  A side-effect of the religion virus is that it stimulates the addictive and pleasure centres of the infected brain not unlike the way that Heroin and other such overwhelming stimulants function to retain control.

The religion virus is extremely addictive, far more powerful that Heroin, yet we all know how extremely difficult, almost impossible, it is for a Heroin user to fight their addiction.

We also know how a Heroin user will literally kill to feed their habit.  They will lie, steal, hurt and betray their family, and nothing will ever get in the way of the process of establishing their next fix.

The religion virus has the same hold over the minds of those it has infected.  It can seem impossible to break free from, making the host aggressive and enter a flight or fight mode when attempts are made to cure them.  As with Heroin addiction, becoming free from the religion virus takes a lot of hard work and often needs intervention from others.

As if trying to fight the religion virus wasn’t enough, the virus itself has mutated into many strains and variations upon the three main types of virus that can be traced back to an origin within primitive desert tribes in the Middle East.  Similarly to many other viruses, the main three types will fight against each other to gain dominance from their type or strain over their host.  They will also try to use the hosts they’ve infected to wipe each other out, by getting the hosts to try to kill each other if they can’t dislodge the rival strain and take control.  The religion virus shows no mercy whatsoever to its hosts and those around them in order to maintain its survival and ability to multiply.

If we as a human race are going to progress and survive this pandemic outbreak of infection by the religion virus, then we need to join together as one and fight the religion virus with the vigour and determination with which we fight the HIV and the H1N1 viruses.

The alternative is that the religion virus will wipe us all out.

3 comments

  1. If parents don't deliberately infect their children from birth, the children usually don't ever catch and suffer from it in later life either. Avoiding that vulnerable period for long enough to reach the age of ability to 'reason' and objectively examine all human habits then self-inoculates against any possibility of later infection. That's where I'm at.

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